COVID-19 Vaccines, Fertility, and Pregnancy

What You Need to Know If You’re Pregnant, Trying to Get Pregnant, or Breastfeeding

If you are pregnant, trying to get pregnant, or are breastfeeding, you may have questions regarding the COVID-19 vaccine and whether it’s safe for you and your growing family. Here’s what our fertility, OB-GYN, and maternal-fetal medicine experts have to say.

As those in our community continue to get vaccinated against COVID-19, there are stil several questions around how the vaccines affect fertility and pregnancy. While there are currently no risks associated with receiving the available vaccine options while pregnant or trying to get pregnant, data has shown that pregnant people have an increased chance of becoming severely ill with COVID-19 when compared to non-pregnant people who contract the virus.

Learn more from our team of fertility, OB-GYN and maternal-fetal medicine experts as they answer common questions about COVID-19 vaccines, fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding.

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As those in our community continue to get vaccinated against COVID-19, there are stil several questions around how the vaccines affect fertility and pregnancy. While there are currently no risks associated with receiving the available vaccine options while pregnant or trying to get pregnant, data has shown that pregnant people have an increased chance of becoming severely ill with COVID-19 when compared to non-pregnant people who contract the virus.

Learn more from our team of fertility, OB-GYN and maternal-fetal medicine experts as they answer common questions about COVID-19 vaccines, fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding.

Closeup of a physician, she wears a white coat, has her hair up and looks towards her left
Closeup of a physician, she wears a white coat, has her hair up and looks towards her left

COVID-19 Vaccine: Facts About Fertility, Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Watch our experts answer questions about the COVID-19 vaccines, fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding.

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Woman smiling, she is sitting down and is wearing a blue blouse with white spots

COVID-19 Vaccinated: Pregnant and Breastfeeding

Hear why these mothers chose to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

Quick Facts

Risks of Not Receiving a COVID-19 Vaccine

Increased risk of exposure to COVID-19 virus.

Icon of a house with heart and two people

Increased risk of severe illness for both the pregnant person and their unborn child from COVID-19, if contracted.

Benefits of Receiving a COVID-19 Vaccine

Potential antibodies that protect the pregnant person and their baby both during pregnancy and while breastfeeding.

Icon of a mom and baby

Increasing data that suggests that the available COVID-19 vaccines are unlikely to pose a significant risk to fertility or pregnancy.

FAQs

Can I receive the COVID-19 vaccine if I’m pregnant or breastfeeding?

Yes, people who are pregnant or breastfeeding are eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, according to guidelines set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Why should I consider the COVID-19 vaccine if I’m pregnant, breastfeeding, or considering pregnancy?

Pregnant people are at an increased risk of severe illness from COVID-19 when compared to those who contract the virus and are not pregnant. Severe illness can lead to hospitalization, intensive care, and the use of a ventilator or special equipment to help with breathing.

Pregnant people with COVID-19 are also at increased risk for preterm birth (delivering the baby earlier than 37 weeks) and other potential complications.

Is it safe for me to receive the COVID-19 vaccine if I’m pregnant?

According to the CDC, there is limited data available about the safety of the COVID-19 vaccine amongst people who are pregnant. Based on how the vaccines work in the body, experts believe they are unlikely to pose a significant risk. If you are pregnant and have questions or concerns about receiving a COVID-19 vaccine, you should discuss them with your healthcare provider prior to getting vaccinated.

Are side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine different for pregnant people?

No, the potential side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine are the same across all populations. They include pain or soreness at the injection site, fatigue, headaches, muscle aches, chills, and fever.

If I want to become pregnant, are there risks associated with getting the COVID-19 vaccine?

Unfounded claims linking COVID-19 vaccines to infertility have been scientifically disproven. Based on the CDC, there is no evidence that any of the available COVID-19 vaccines cause infertility or reduce your natural fertility.

According to the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, COVID-19 vaccination is recommended for people who are contemplating pregnancy or who are pregnant to minimize risks to themselves and their pregnancy.

Is it safe to receive the COVID-19 vaccine if I’m breastfeeding?

There is limited data available about the safety of COVID-19 vaccines for people who are breastfeeding. According to the CDC, based on how the vaccines work in the body, experts believe they are unlikely to pose a significant risk to lactating mothers and their children. Additionally, COVID-19 vaccines cannot cause infection in any recipient, including those who are breastfeeding. If you are breastfeeding and have questions or concerns about receiving a COVID-19 vaccine, you should discuss them with your healthcare provider prior to getting vaccinated.

In a recent study featured in the Journal of the American Medical Association, two types of antibodies were found in breast milk after vaccination. This suggests potential protection against the COVID-19 infection for infants. None of the mothers or their infants experienced any serious adverse events during the six-week study period.

Is the efficacy of the COVID-19 vaccine different for people who are pregnant?

While there is limited data available about the efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines amongst pregnant people, the vaccines appear to be equally effective in those who are pregnant and those who are not.