Patient Care & Safety

At Jackson Health System, we strive to provide the highest quality of care and safety to all patients. Here’s everything you need to know.

Overview

If a person has any concerns about patient care and safety that have not been addressed, they are encouraged to contact management staff. To talk about complaints, you or your family member should tell your nurse, nurse manager, or person in charge of the area where you are a patient. If you feel your complaint has not been resolved, you or your family member should contact the Guest Services Department of the hospital you are in.

Patient Bill of Rights

Jackson Health System’s healthcare facilities support the Patient’s Bill of Rights and Responsibilities, which are recognized as applying to all adults and children who are patients, their parents and/or guardians. A patient has the right to a quick and fair answer to questions and requests. Any patient, parent, or guardian who feels the patient is not being treated in the correct way has the right to complain about the care received, to have those complaints reviewed and, when possible, solved. A patient complaint will not change the kind of care given to the patient.

Read the Patient’s Bill of Rights and Responsibilities.

Overview

If a person has any concerns about patient care and safety that have not been addressed, they are encouraged to contact management staff. To talk about complaints, you or your family member should tell your nurse, nurse manager, or person in charge of the area where you are a patient. If you feel your complaint has not been resolved, you or your family member should contact the Guest Services Department of the hospital you are in.

Patient Bill of Rights

Jackson Health System’s healthcare facilities support the Patient’s Bill of Rights and Responsibilities, which are recognized as applying to all adults and children who are patients, their parents and/or guardians. A patient has the right to a quick and fair answer to questions and requests. Any patient, parent, or guardian who feels the patient is not being treated in the correct way has the right to complain about the care received, to have those complaints reviewed and, when possible, solved. A patient complaint will not change the kind of care given to the patient.

Read the Patient’s Bill of Rights and Responsibilities.

Meaningful Information For Better Health Care

Jackson Health System’s Quality Data

Patient access to health information is becoming increasingly important in today’s healthcare society. Jackson Health System is committed to making credible, reliable information about healthcare quality available to everyone. At Jackson, one of our top priorities is to help individuals make informed healthcare decisions for themselves and their loved ones based on objective measures of quality care.

Patient Education – Emergency Room Tips

  • Upon arrival, patients are triaged in the order of the acuity of their illness as well as in the order in which they arrive. Patients who do not have an emergency medical condition upon the screening examination may be referred to our Primary Care Centers or clinics. Additionally, we have an Express Care area for those who need to be seen quickly, but are not experiencing serious conditions.
  • If you are experiencing any respiratory symptoms, such as a cough or shortness of breath, or a rash with a fever or chest pain, report to the triage nurse immediately upon arrival.
  • The way for patients without immediate life-threatening emergencies may be prolonged during busier times, so please bring reading material.
  • Once you arrive, do not eat until you have seen the physician.
  • Please bring as much information about your medical history and condition with you including any old records, old EKGs, lists of allergies and all the medications you are taking, as well as the name and phone number of any doctors you are seeing.
  • You must keep any follow-up appointments you are given.
  • Take medications exactly as directed.
  • Bring photo ID and any insurance information.
  • To help expedite your care, if you do not speak English well, please bring someone who does with you if you can.

Primary Care vs. Emergency Room

Knowing the difference between an emergency and routine medical care is essential when someone is sick or inured. As not every situation is an emergency, it’s crucial to know the difference and where to go for care. A primary care center is just like going to a private doctor’s office, you make an appointment and see your physician for routine care. An emergency room is for life-threatening conditions.

Primary Care

  • Cold or Flu
  • Allergies
  • Arthritis
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Skin Rash
  • Prenatal Care
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Refill Prescriptions
  • Immunizations
  • Sore Throat
  • Fever
  • Earache
  • Back Pain
  • Headache

Emergency Room Care

  • Loss of Consciousness
  • Broken Bones
  • Chest Pain
  • Deep Cuts and Lacerations
  • Head Injury
  • Vomitting Blood
  • Seizures
  • Difficulty Breathing
  • Acute Asthma

Patient Education – Emergency Room Tips

  • Upon arrival, patients are triaged in the order of the acuity of their illness as well as in the order in which they arrive. Patients who do not have an emergency medical condition upon the screening examination may be referred to our Primary Care Centers or clinics. Additionally, we have an Express Care area for those who need to be seen quickly, but are not experiencing serious conditions.
  • If you are experiencing any respiratory symptoms, such as a cough or shortness of breath, or a rash with a fever or chest pain, report to the triage nurse immediately upon arrival.
  • The way for patients without immediate life-threatening emergencies may be prolonged during busier times, so please bring reading material.
  • Once you arrive, do not eat until you have seen the physician.
  • Please bring as much information about your medical history and condition with you including any old records, old EKGs, lists of allergies and all the medications you are taking, as well as the name and phone number of any doctors you are seeing.
  • You must keep any follow-up appointments you are given.
  • Take medications exactly as directed.
  • Bring photo ID and any insurance information.
  • To help expedite your care, if you do not speak English well, please bring someone who does with you if you can.

Primary Care vs. Emergency Room

Knowing the difference between an emergency and routine medical care is essential when someone is sick or inured. As not every situation is an emergency, it’s crucial to know the difference and where to go for care. A primary care center is just like going to a private doctor’s office, you make an appointment and see your physician for routine care. An emergency room is for life-threatening conditions.

Primary Care

  • Cold or Flu
  • Allergies
  • Arthritis
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Skin Rash
  • Prenatal Care
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Refill Prescriptions
  • Immunizations
  • Sore Throat
  • Fever
  • Earache
  • Back Pain
  • Headache

Emergency Room Care

  • Loss of Consciousness
  • Broken Bones
  • Chest Pain
  • Deep Cuts and Lacerations
  • Head Injury
  • Vomitting Blood
  • Seizures
  • Difficulty Breathing
  • Acute Asthma

Reporting Complaints & Grievances

We want to improve patient care by giving patients and their families a way to communicate complaints. We want to make sure they are solved quickly. To talk about complaints/grievances, you or your family member should tell your nurse, nurse manager or person in charge of the area where you are a patient. If you feel your complaint has not been resolved, you or your family should ask to have the Patient Representative called, or call the Guest Services Office at 305-585-7341 to speak to a Patient Representative.

General Complaints or Grievances
If you wish to send a written complaint/grievance, please address it to:

    Administrator of Patient Services
    Jackson Health System
    1611 N.W. 12th Avenue, West Wing 104
    Miami, FL 33136

Complaints Against a Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center
Call the Consumer Assistance Unit at 1-888-419-3456 (press 1) or write to this address:

    Agency for Health Care Administration
    Consumer Assistance Unit
    2727 Mahan Drive, Building 1
    Tallahassee, FL 32308

Complaint Against a Healthcare Professional
Call the Consumer Assistance Unit at 1-888-419-3456 (press 2) or write to this address:

    Agency for Health Care Administration
    Consumer Assistance Unit
    P.O. Box 14000
    Tallahassee, FL 32317

Joint Commission
Patients or family members can contact the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization’s Office of Quality Monitoring to report any concerns:

    Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations
    Office of Quality Monitoring
    1-800-994-6610
    complaint@jcaho.org

Reporting Complaints & Grievances

We want to improve patient care by giving patients and their families a way to communicate complaints. We want to make sure they are solved quickly. To talk about complaints/grievances, you or your family member should tell your nurse, nurse manager or person in charge of the area where you are a patient. If you feel your complaint has not been resolved, you or your family should ask to have the Patient Representative called, or call the Guest Services Office at 305-585-7341 to speak to a Patient Representative.

General Complaints or Grievances
If you wish to send a written complaint/grievance, please address it to:

    Administrator of Patient Services
    Jackson Health System
    1611 N.W. 12th Avenue, West Wing 104
    Miami, FL 33136

Complaints Against a Hospital or Ambulatory Surgical Center
Call the Consumer Assistance Unit at 1-888-419-3456 (press 1) or write to this address:

    Agency for Health Care Administration
    Consumer Assistance Unit
    2727 Mahan Drive, Building 1
    Tallahassee, FL 32308

Complaint Against a Healthcare Professional
Call the Consumer Assistance Unit at 1-888-419-3456 (press 2) or write to this address:

    Agency for Health Care Administration
    Consumer Assistance Unit
    P.O. Box 14000
    Tallahassee, FL 32317

Joint Commission
Patients or family members can contact the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization’s Office of Quality Monitoring to report any concerns:

    Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations
    Office of Quality Monitoring
    1-800-994-6610
    complaint@jcaho.org

Social Work & Discharge Planning

Jackson Health System social workers have been specially trained to work with individuals and families in dealing with personal and interpersonal crises caused by illness and hospitalization. The social worker’s role is a varied and complex one, but in all cases, he or she plays a vital part in maximizing wellness during the hospital stay and in easing the transition back home or to an appropriate healthcare facility for the next stage of your care. The goal includes assisting patients with their advanced directives, appropriate discharge planning, and counseling for patients and family members related to the impact of illness and hospitalization.

Social Work
Time spent in the hospital often brings anxiety, fear and questions to be answered for patients, their friends and families. Doctors, nurses and other caregivers provide medical support, but it is the responsibility of the social worker to provide the emotional support during what can be a stressful time. This is essential to ensure a positive outcome.

Our social workers have been specially trained to work with individuals and families in dealing with personal and interpersonal crises caused by illness and hospitalization. The social worker’s role is a varied and complex one, but in all cases, he or she plays a vital part in maximizing wellness during the hospital stay and in easing the transition back home or to a healthcare facility.

The goal of social work includes assisting patient with their advance directives, appropriate discharge planning and counseling for patients and family members related to the impact of illness and hospitalization.

Patient and Family Advocacy
During a patient’s hospital stay, social workers facilitate family involvement with the entire treatment team. They keep the family apprised of the patient’s progress and explain how the family can help the patient recover. Our social workers assist in acquiring the tools to cope with troubling situations such as:

  • Traumatic and chronic illness
  • Alcoholism and/or drug dependency
  • Financial and emotional strain of caring for a disabled family member
  • Marital difficulties due to illness
  • Adult and pediatric abuse and domestic violence
  • Bereavement

Discharge Planning
Whether a patient is going home or transferring to another healthcare facility, social workers make the transition as smooth as possible. They identify resources in the community that are best suited to the patient’s medical and financial situation. They also recommend alternative care if the patient cannot return home.

Counseling Services
Through individual and group interventions, social workers help patients and families with psychological, social, and family issues associated with illness, loss, hospitalization, or outpatient treatment. They also provide counseling for personal or financial problems related to disability or chronic illness.

For more information, call 305-585-7778 or 305-585-5264.

Social Work & Discharge Planning

Jackson Health System social workers have been specially trained to work with individuals and families in dealing with personal and interpersonal crises caused by illness and hospitalization. The social worker’s role is a varied and complex one, but in all cases, he or she plays a vital part in maximizing wellness during the hospital stay and in easing the transition back home or to an appropriate healthcare facility for the next stage of your care. The goal includes assisting patients with their advanced directives, appropriate discharge planning, and counseling for patients and family members related to the impact of illness and hospitalization.

Social Work
Time spent in the hospital often brings anxiety, fear and questions to be answered for patients, their friends and families. Doctors, nurses and other caregivers provide medical support, but it is the responsibility of the social worker to provide the emotional support during what can be a stressful time. This is essential to ensure a positive outcome.

Our social workers have been specially trained to work with individuals and families in dealing with personal and interpersonal crises caused by illness and hospitalization. The social worker’s role is a varied and complex one, but in all cases, he or she plays a vital part in maximizing wellness during the hospital stay and in easing the transition back home or to a healthcare facility.

The goal of social work includes assisting patient with their advance directives, appropriate discharge planning and counseling for patients and family members related to the impact of illness and hospitalization.

Patient and Family Advocacy
During a patient’s hospital stay, social workers facilitate family involvement with the entire treatment team. They keep the family apprised of the patient’s progress and explain how the family can help the patient recover. Our social workers assist in acquiring the tools to cope with troubling situations such as:

  • Traumatic and chronic illness
  • Alcoholism and/or drug dependency
  • Financial and emotional strain of caring for a disabled family member
  • Marital difficulties due to illness
  • Adult and pediatric abuse and domestic violence
  • Bereavement

Discharge Planning
Whether a patient is going home or transferring to another healthcare facility, social workers make the transition as smooth as possible. They identify resources in the community that are best suited to the patient’s medical and financial situation. They also recommend alternative care if the patient cannot return home.

Counseling Services
Through individual and group interventions, social workers help patients and families with psychological, social, and family issues associated with illness, loss, hospitalization, or outpatient treatment. They also provide counseling for personal or financial problems related to disability or chronic illness.

For more information, call 305-585-7778 or 305-585-5264.

Advanced Directives

Designation of Healthcare Surrogate
Many people today are concerned about the medical care that they would be given if they became seriously ill and unable to speak for themselves. In some cases, this will be a temporary state and after successful treatment of the illness, you will be able to make decisions again. In order to provide a way for your wishes to be carried out during this time, you can appoint a person to make these decisions for you. Under Florida law this person is called the Health Care Surrogate.

Living Will
In some cases, your medical condition may be so serious that you are likely to die or remain in a coma or have to remain in a hospital or nursing home. Some people don’t want to spend months or years dependent on life-support machines, and they don’t want to cause unnecessary emotional or financial distress for their loved ones. Others desire to be treated as long as treatment has positive benefits. In order to make your wishes known in these situations, you may choose to sign a “Living Will.” In this way, you can make your wishes known now, so that they can be carried out if necessary in the future.

Advanced Directives are documents that help you make your healthcare decision before you become sick. You can choose a person to make your healthcare decision for you, or you may choose to put your own wishes in writing. At Jackson Health System, we use one form that covers both the designation of a healthcare surrogate and living will.

Advanced Directives

Designation of Healthcare Surrogate
Many people today are concerned about the medical care that they would be given if they became seriously ill and unable to speak for themselves. In some cases, this will be a temporary state and after successful treatment of the illness, you will be able to make decisions again. In order to provide a way for your wishes to be carried out during this time, you can appoint a person to make these decisions for you. Under Florida law this person is called the Health Care Surrogate.

Living Will
In some cases, your medical condition may be so serious that you are likely to die or remain in a coma or have to remain in a hospital or nursing home. Some people don’t want to spend months or years dependent on life-support machines, and they don’t want to cause unnecessary emotional or financial distress for their loved ones. Others desire to be treated as long as treatment has positive benefits. In order to make your wishes known in these situations, you may choose to sign a “Living Will.” In this way, you can make your wishes known now, so that they can be carried out if necessary in the future.

Advanced Directives are documents that help you make your healthcare decision before you become sick. You can choose a person to make your healthcare decision for you, or you may choose to put your own wishes in writing. At Jackson Health System, we use one form that covers both the designation of a healthcare surrogate and living will.